'I had one beer, right?': Trump mocks Brett Kavanaugh accuser's testimony

Share

In his most direct attack on Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault while both were teenagers in Maryland, Trump sought to highlight holes in the account Ford gave in sworn testimony to the Judiciary Committee last week. That does not conflict with Ford's testimony, as she's said she didn't disclose the alleged assault until 2012.

Forget yesterday's news. Get what you need today in this early-morning email. "My whole life, I've heard you're innocent until proven guilty". I don't remember. Where is the place? Against the backdrop of breathless reporting on the women's vote and what it means in the midterms, Trump is seeking to fire up "inelastic" voters who turned up for him in 2016 and continue to feel threatened by an entirely new set of social circumstances that may have little to do with why they voted Trump two years ago.

"Where's the house? I don't know!" I don't know. Upstairs, downstairs, where was it?

The FBI investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is being questioned by lawyers for two of his accusers.

Another member of the panel, Democratic Sen.

Senator Jeff Flake, a moderate Republican who could be pivotal in the confirmation vote, raised fresh concerns about the judge's "partisan" tone at the Judiciary Committee hearing. "'I don't know.' 'But I had one beer, that's the only thing I remember, '" the president said as the crowd cheered. The incident happened in 1985 when Kavanaugh, an undergrad at Yale at the time, mistook a 21-year-old man at a local bar for Ali Campbell, the lead singer of UB40 (who had performed in the area that night), and allegedly threw ice and a beer at him, causing injury.

"I just hope that we find fact", Flake said.

Under pressure from opposition Democrats and a handful of his own Republicans, Trump on Friday ordered a fresh FBI investigation into allegations of Kavanaugh's sexual misconduct during his youth. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has vowed that the Senate will vote on Kavanaugh this week. Underscoring the GOP effort to vote on Kavanaugh quickly - and stuff a cork on the chances for fresh allegations to emerge - he said "it shouldn't take long" for lawmakers to read that report.

Trump's biggest supporter inside his family Donald Trump Jr played the same tune in an interview aired Monday: "I've got boys and I've got girls, and when I see what's going on right now, it's scary".

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 4, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Also Tuesday, an attorney for another accuser, Deborah Ramirez, said he's seen no indication that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has reached out to any of the 20 people who Ramirez told them may be able to corroborate her account that Kavanaugh exposed himself to her when they were Yale freshmen.

Speaking briefly to reporters, Collins said, "The president's comments were just plain wrong".

Ludington said the man in question was annoyed by Kavanaugh and his classmates' attention, and got into an altercation with the Yale students, according to a report.

Ford told the senate she was "100%" certain that he was her attacker. "The Senate will vote on Judge Kavanaugh here, on this floor, this week", McConnell told the chamber.

That claim was further called into question on Tuesday after the New York Times published a copy of a letter written by Kavanaugh in 1983 where he warned his friends of the danger of eviction from a beachfront condo they had rented for the weekend. He had previously called Ford a "very credible witness". A third claim - from Julia Swetnick, who is represented by attorney Michael Avenatti - accuses Kavanaugh of excessive drinking and inappropriate treatment of women at parties in the early 1980s.

Share