BWS: Subtropical Storm 'Not Threat To Bermuda'

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It's located around 1,200 miles west-northwest of The Azores, with winds that have picked up a little to 45 mph as it moves north-northeast at 9 mph.

- Hurricane John advanced northwestward along Mexico's western coast on Wednesday and it was expected to stir up heavy surf and drop rain on the southern Baja California Peninsula while keeping away from landfall.

Big Island officials are taking precautions in advance of the storm nearing the state.

The last - and weakest - cyclone in the Pacific is Tropical Storm Kristy, which is no threat to land.

On Aug. 6 at 4:40 a.m. EDT (0840 UTC) NASA's Aqua satellite found coldest temperatures of strongest thunderstorms (yellow) in Tropical Storm John were as cold as or colder than.

Meteorologist Melissa Dye says the southern half of the island should brace for winds of 35 miles per hour (56.3 kph) or higher.

There have been three named Atlantic storms this year: Subtropical Storm Alberto formed in May, followed by hurricanes Beryl and Chris.

Hector also posed no immediate threat to land, but the center said people in Hawaii should monitor the storm's progress as it was projected to pass just south of the islands by midweek.

Hector's center will track about 150 miles south of the Big Island today, then continuing westward, remaining well south of the rest of the Hawaiian Islands through Thursday.

High Surf Warning up to 15 feet for east and southeast facing shores until 6 p.m. Wednesday. Forecasters note that hurricane-force winds extend up to 35 miles from the center of the storm, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles.

Over the next few days, Hector is expected to gradually weaken.

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