Google to Android Phone Makers: Don't Go Crazy With the Notches

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Additionally, Google also highlights that in order for cutouts to not intrude or negatively affect apps, two requirements are needed.

Some Android phone makers may still deviate from Google's cap on two cutouts, but they'd probably do so at the risk of falling foul of Google's compatibility definition document that outline rules for Android device makers.

Specifically, Google is limiting the number of notches - or "cutouts", as they're technically called - to two.

Moreover, for developer testing and users who want to try the notch before buying a smartphone, Google has already added a notch simulator that you can access in the Developer Options.

You won't see multiple cutouts on a single edge, or more than two cutouts on a device. "This [means that you] won't see multiple cutouts on a single edge, or more than two cutouts on a device".

Phone designers were apparently going overboard if Google had prevent them from putting in three or more. The company explained how it had made it easier for developers to utilize the cutout area efficiently in Android P, and also encouraged them to test their apps using an Android P device or the Android Emulator before publication. And in a recent Android Developers Blog post, Google described in greater detail what it's doing to enhance the functionality of modern displays, both with and without notches.

Google did say that on devices running Android 8.1 or earlier, users can decide to "extend a letterboxed fullscreen or landscape app into the cutout area". Nonetheless, we could find out soon enough, and even see stable versions of the software on some phones in August itself.

Huawei is reportedly planning to release a phone with a notch-like hole in the display panel that would house the front-facing camera.

People might credit iPhone X for bringing the notch into our lives; Essential did it before Apple with its PH-1 Android smartphone.

This little black cut-out on top of the screen may look like an eyesore, but more and more phones are jumping on this trend.

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