Watch the explosion that occurs when lava pours into the ocean

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Kilauea, on Hawaii's Big Island, first started erupting on May 3, resulting in lava oozing over residential communities and heading towards the Pacific Ocean.

Hawaii's Kīlauea volcano has been erupting since May 3, and according to the county of Hawaii's civil defense agency, another small explosion occurred on Sunday morning. "The lava flow is contained within a channel flowing to the ocean with only minor outflows".

It's possible a new fissure will open or vigorous flows could emerge from vents that have been inactive. A 5.3-magnitude natural disaster accompanied the latest eruption.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that the eruption continues in the lower East Rift Zone. Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and at the ocean entry continue to be very high. Venturing too close to an ocean entry on land or the ocean exposes you to flying debris from sudden explosive interaction between lava and water.

Lava from the Kilauea volcano erupts from a fissure and forms a river of lava flowing down to Kapoho on Sunday
Lava from the Kilauea volcano erupts from a fissure and forms a river of lava flowing down to Kapoho on Sunday

Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim announced the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) would carry out an assessment of the number of houses Kilauea destroyed over the coming days, adding the affected buildings could be as many as 700. To date, the lava has destroyed more than 600 homes.

The eruption has also had a toll on the area's tourism industry, with many afraid to travel to the island.

Lava continued to fountain out of Fissure 8, reaching heights of about 200 feet, while Pele's hair and other lightweight volcanic glass accumulated on the ground within Leilani Estates area.

"When waves splash onto molten lava, they "explode" in a cloud of steam, hot water and tephra (molten splatter) called a 'tephra jet, '" the USGS wrote on Facebook.

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